#Inspiration Mass Incarceration in the US (Video)

This was pretty awesome! In short… THESE are the types of videos that I would like to create. It is hard to argue facts. If we can figure out how to turn PhD publications into 3 minute videos like this, I believe we could see changes in social justice policies and society very quickly. Long publications are still needed, but what good is knowledge if the people who need it most do not have access to it, or cannot understand it? Along with these videos, I would also like to find ways to allow undeserved individuals (both in and out of the criminal justice system) to tell their own stories. One day closer.

My Beloved World – US Supreme Court Chief Justice Sonia Sotomayor

My Beloved World - US Supreme Court Chief Justice Sonia Sotomayor

On Monday, March 10, 2014 I was able to hear United States Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speak about her life and brand new memoir My Beloved World at the University of Washington’s HUB Ballroom. The event was packed. She gave us many words and lessons to live by and showed us what a world class leader looks like. Although I’m already halfway through her book I really wanted a signed copy. They ran out of copies, but guess who’s face showed up the morning after in the Seattle Times! šŸ˜‰

-AmbassadorNique

6 Myths About Poverty


I thought this was very interesting. At a time when talking heads care more aboutĀ Facebook IPO’s, who will smith slapped, and what people are doing in the privacy of their own bedrooms. There are a lot of myths about poverty that circulate, especially during an election year when the word poverty is avoided at all cost. As the world continues to occupy, in the mist of post Nato conference demonstrations and as we enter the 100th day of a student protest in Montreal, Canada, here is a repost of 6 myths on povertyā€¦ If you donā€™t know.. now you know.. I guess the revolution really WONā€™T be televisedā€¦ Especially not if Rupert Murdoch and Ted Turner have anything to say about it. The post was taken from change.orgā€™s Christopher Hill.

Enjoy,
Ambassador

The following passage was taken from an article written by Chris Hill of change.org

#1: The United States has one of the lowest poverty rates in the industrialized world.

Nope, sorry. At about 17 percent, the U.S. actually has theĀ third-highest poverty rateĀ of all the OECD countries, coming in only slightly ahead of Turkey and Mexico. Denmark boasts the lowest poverty rate, an inspiring five percent.

#2: Income inequality isn’t a big problem in America.
Incorrect. Unfortunately, the U.S. still hasĀ above-average income inequality, joining the likes of Poland, Portugal, and, once again, Mexico and Turkey. Is this any surprise? After all, in 2006, CEOs of large U.S. companiesĀ made more moneyĀ in a day than average American workers made throughout the year.

#3: Due to our exquisite health system, Americans live longer than residents of other countries.
Wrong, once again. TheĀ average life spanĀ of an American is below the OECD average, right above the Czech Republic. Of course, rich Americans can still expect to live to ripe old ages; an average wealthy white woman, for example, will enjoy 81.1 years of life. TheĀ average life expectancyĀ for her poor, black, male counterpart, on the other hand, is only 66.9 years.

#4: Okay, well, due to our exquisite health system, the U.S. has a lower infant mortality rate than other countries.
No. In fact, out of all the OECD countries, we rankĀ third to lastĀ in terms of infant mortality. But at least we get to hang out with our good friends, Mexico and Turkey, who once again join us at the losers’ table.

#5: At least Americans don’t have to spend as much money on health care as people from other countries … right?
The truth is quite the opposite. Americans spend substantially more on their health than people from any other OECD country.Ā Over 15 percentĀ of the national GDP isĀ spent on health care; Switzerland, the closest contender for most money spent on health care, only comes in at 11 percent.

#6: The U.S. spends more money on helping the poor than any other industrialized nation.
This is perhaps the biggest myth of all. At about 16 percent, the United States ranksĀ fourth to lastĀ in public social expenditures as a percentage of GDP, beating only Turkey, Mexico and Korea. On the other end of the spectrum, Sweden spends about 29 percent of its GDP on public social expenditures.